Tony & Liz (Off With Her Head) - Limited Edition Screen Print

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Mocks-Up-Frame-Hbd.jpg
eve-copy1.jpg
Envelope.jpg
IMG_1880-copy-3.jpg
IMG_1867-2-copy.jpg
L1110780-copy-3.jpg
IMG_1868-2-copy.jpg
IMG_1865-2-copy.jpg
IMG_1866-2-copy.jpg
IMG_1876-2-copy.jpg
L1110783-copy-3.jpg
IMG_1878-2-copy.jpg
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Tony & Liz (Off With Her Head) - Limited Edition Screen Print

35.00

In 1965 the then post master general Tony Benn changed the criteria for what could appear on postage stamps. Before this, commemorative stamps had to feature a large representation of the monarch’s head, which dominated the design taking up to 75% of the available space. Designer/ illustrator David Gentleman, wrote to Benn suggesting alternative stamp designs, also proposing that the queens image be replaced by another symbol, such as a crown or the words or “United Kingdom”. Instead a much reduced silhouette of The Queen was used and this has been the standard ever since.

During this time I was still only a twinkle in my mother and father’s eyes, but during the turbulent political years of the 1970s and 1980s, the pipe smoking socialist Tony Benn was a poster boy in our house. I marvelled at his eloquence, my dad, Albert, even taking me to see him speak at a smoke filled trade union meeting in the 1980s. During this same period I was studying English Literature at school and was attracted and intrigued by the bold, direct, wood engravings of the New Penguin Shakespeare series covers. It was only some years later at art college in London that I was to discover this was the magical work of David Gentleman.

When researching the history of the postage stamp to produce an image for this exhibition, I was thrilled to discover these small personal connections which stirred such strong memories, and for me at least inform the story behind the stamp. This image (for what it’s worth) is for those 3 principled men Tony Benn, David Gentleman and Albert Murray who have all informed, inspired and enriched me.

The prints in response to the exhibition ‘Pushing The Envelope’,  celebrating the 175 th anniversary of the postage stamp, held at House of Illustration London.

 

Limited Edition of 12. Postal Art, 4 colour screen print

You have the choice your name, address and postage being written and attached to the envelope itself and sent to you as postal art (name and address will appear in white cloud on image) or the envelope being wrapped and posted as normal.

Signed numbered and embossed

Dimensions:   W 52 cm  x  H 35 cm 

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